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Limos

Michigan Prop 1

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imiubu

I will have a video conference Wed. a.m. with a friend who can more easily break down prop 1 line by line to

prepare me to more concisely present my POV.

 

Thanks @ Shaggy

and I agree... limos is a stellar feller :D

 


 

 

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shaggy

I do hear you.

Let me try to explain it this way.

37 minutes ago, Limos said:

Why can’t it come later after this is Inacted if it’s going to be that great that ALL will see the light and vehemently vote for it?

Rights once lost are hard to get back, like virginity.🤩

37 minutes ago, Limos said:

This is not a negotiation. If this gets voted down you can almost bet some more restrictive will take its place & if that’s what the strategy is to get people on board...ridiculous restrictive legislation to unify....that’s BS. 

The people must say loudly what it is they expect from legalization.

 

If the people push back hard enough that will make it harder for them to make that a reality.

Again I say IF? I see your point here also.

37 minutes ago, Limos said:

Why on earth is stopping simple possession arrests a bad thing? You card holders have strong opinions but I invite you to look at it from a non card holders perspective & tell me why this isn’t a bad starting point. 

You have a valid point here.

But

I feel this could be implimented already, pre-legalization.

If they wanted to that is.

 

It should be pretty evident to most that cannabis prohibition was based on lies and deciet therefore that statement alone should be enought to stop current prosecution.

That is if the prosecutors had any common sense or decency to do the right thing regardless of the currently flawed laws.

 

I guess what burns me the most is cops and judges have been imprisoning folks for cannabis for a long long time.

The culture has remained in support of cannabis despite jail time ect.

And now it is finally being accepted and the culture that stood the test of time is being forgotten even ridiculed by some even on cannabis sites and all in the name of greed!

To make matters worse and it is a real slap in the face, the cops, judges, even the EX-DEA are running the show, reaping the benefits and raking in the cannabis-cash.

To me they should release anyone that was jailed by these public servants as they are now cashing in on the same action they jailed other for.

Now that is truly a crime against humanity, if you ask me anyhow.

Edited by shaggyballs

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Ilynnboy
On 9/13/2018 at 2:19 PM, Limos said:

Yeah I’ve read all that still not sure how I am personally getting fucked as the proposal sits right now. Perhaps I’m missing something? 

 

I’m gonna go out on a limb here and say that if MI could’ve done better it would’ve done so by now. I hope to be proven wrong & I’ll support a good proposal best I can. 

 

There’s talk & implications about corporate greed, shady politicians, & back door deals. While I’m with you 100% on that I have to say, most people (not all) that I have met in the medical community & the greater cannabis community wouldn’t throw a bucket of water on you if you were on fire unless it benefited them somehow. The people in power are not the only ones that are greedy and time after time it’s people in our own community that have fucked us with their greed & disregard for anyone else but themselves. 

 

Also you guys keep bringing up OH? Was OH proposal similar? There’s wasn’t room for any home grows at all was there? 

 

Let me take a step step back for a minute...thinking of family and friends that do not have a med card & might get popped for simple possession...is this prop so bad? Also if the will of the people is to decriminalize & not regulate wouldn’t it be ok to pass this now with decriminalize efforts being worked on for the future? I’ll assume that the organization your working with @imiubu will shoot for a constitutional amendment therefore squashing any pervious law? 

 

 

 

 

Ohio is/was Stoopid....

I lost out on being able to legally grow because of Stupidity in the voting populace.

Now I cannot Grow, nor can I get a Medical card here in Ohio... You have to be next to Death here in Ohio to get approved for MMJ.

Ya Don’t vote for something good and wait for Perfect...

You will wait and wait and wait and wait some more.

Not going to Happen EVER!!!!

All of the Medical users and growers forget what it’s like?

Any move forward is a Move Forward.....

Vote Yes.... A better Law Will Not Come Round. This I know firsthand....

Ohio Sux...

Oh @Limos if it would have passed I would have been allowed to grow 4 plants... Hell 4 Trees equals pounds....

 

Nah I don’t need pounds of weed at a farmers production cost.

Let me buy it from a dealer at $200 an ounce....

STOOPID...Don’t Be STOOPID. ( and Yes I can spell)

Just keep waiting and More people will go to Jail over a stupid plant... Oh Ya Keep waiting... STILL WAITING HERE IN Ohio......... Still waiting............Still waiting...

5 years later still waiting

4 years later still waiting...

3 years later still waiting

2 years later still waiting

a year later waiting patiently....

So just vote Down an Inperfect Law. Hell  ya we want FreeWeed... Free growing, free trade..Free everything...

Too Bad that’s Not How it Works...

 

My 4 Plants would have been better than driving to Michigan every 3 months to get hooked up with Shatter.

 

Nah we don’t like rules...Vote No... Sheesh... I thought neighbors learned from each other....

Seems as if Michigan voters learned Nothing from Ohio...

Theres Ohio’s situation... Now what was said about Ohio? Where I Live and Work?

And Hide My Cannabis Use....

Edited by Ilynnboy

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imiubu

IMHO "It doesn't work that way" because too many ppl believe it doesn't work that way. 

We the people do have the power to make change, it is slow and EXPENSIVE to run a Ballot Initiative so...

the ppl with $$ and know more ppl with money to help fund/ finance the Initiative are the ones who get it pushed forward first. 

Grass roots are broke yet it more folks would step up to volunteer/ donate, we could/ can and HAVE written something much "better".

It takes people getting off their armchairs and doing something towards the change they want, not to just sit back, complain then

roll over when a crap piece of legislation is introduced, sigh.

We the people were not the driving force behind Prop 1.

 

Vote NO.  It's is just more prohibition.

 

BTW... MMFLA is still in place and will function whether prop 1 passes or not.

The fear that the legs will writes something worse is possible sure, probable... maybe but

that won't happen over night either.  Gives we the people time to press forward with something truly 'better'

I suppose I've never been one to follow the group as they jump over the cliff.

 

I enjoy having these conversations and sharing ideas/ opinions.

I however do not think it conducive to positive discussion to call names.

Attack the ideas, not the people.  Don't make it personal.

 

Because my opinion differs... does not make me stoopid.

 


 

 

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GoodEnergyGrower

Good Day to all.  Hope this finds you doing well.  I really wanted to continue this conversation, there is an opportunity to gain much insight, and by doing so we can gain more respect and understanding of eachother....hopefully.  Remember, Cannabis is supposed to unite us.  It unites me with my soul, my heart and it helps me remember that we as humans are all good at heart, we all just want to be free to do what makes us happy, whether it be cannabis or reading a book or collecting rain water;)  In saying that, lets try and remember we enjoy one another.   Speak with your heart first, nobody is going to believe in the exact same thing, and that is awesome!!  It means we live somewhere, which we have the freedom to form our own ideas, beliefs and expression.  We are one.

 

I hope to not offend anyone here, ruffle feathers and so forth.  I also never mean to be preachy or appear to be using this as a "soapbox."  I am passionate about humanity, because I have scraped the bottom within myself and within a society I was born into, and given a belief system, imaginary borders and a set of rules derived from authority figures before me.  Yet, there are many who would say the same thing, from living different experiences or being from a different geographical location.

 

We live in a socially engineered environment, we are given choices to choose from.  For example, there are more choices than Democrat and Republican, many know this, some don't.  But what rarely happens, is the ancient, organic human expression is to band together for true freedom.  Imaginary borders create imaginary rivalries, imaginary divisions that we are educated to obey.  As humans continue on learning and technology and discovery continue to develop as well, these innovations are not always used for the common good, but to further control over humanity within these imaginary borders which now spans worldwide.

 

Cannabis legalization for "recreational" purposes.  Think about that.  It is not legalization, but regulating yet another aspect of your human life, what you do for fun.  It is from nature.  It has killed less people than water.  It has healed more people than harmed, this is for sure.  I am one who has been healed from it.  

 

This discussion thus far, has taught me empathy, it has helped me view the other perspective I know exists in another fellow human.  I wish to understand that, so I may understand myself further, and my standing on issues deeper.  I am begging to understand the divide and why it exists, and it is a perception, let's keep discussing so we understand eachother.

 

To those whom have been arrested for this plant, I have no words, but I am sorry this has happened.  It would be great to live in a world where this is no longer a worry, to be arrested, fined or jailed for such a thing.  I would look for any opportunity to find a way for that not to happen to anyone else.  This legalization would make that so, proposal 1 would make it so, to a point. 

 

I wish for cannabis to be free to anyone, back in Mother Earth where it belongs, a big hurdle yes.  It is where it once was, imagine if it was always that way.  Humans would have found a way to control pollination, whether it be mesh nets or something other.  If it were legalized fully, we could regulate and  enforce the male plant....why not?  Make regulations based off of growers knowledge on how to maintain the males and females.  We already spend millions controlling the deer population, why not cannabis pollination?  Create jobs doing that.

 

I believe though for a full legalization saying, free to all, for all is a big, big step and can come only, in this way of government is, at a federal level.  It can start on a state level, but it may be hindered by the federal?  Not sure.  But it was a big, big step outlawing it and jailing generations, and the injustices from that including the racial.

 

@Limos @imiubu  Just being someone who loves to hear all sides of everything (I was a paralegal for many years).  I would vote in a heartbeat for prosecutions for possession to dis appear, and I would vote in a heartbeat for an immediate freeing of the plant.  My head is on one side, and my heart and soul on another....seems they have found another way to divide me, lol!   I think it would be fantastic for anyone who wanted to grow 4-12 plants could, I think it would be life expanding, soul orgasmic just to see this plant freed.  It has saved my fricken life, it saved me.  It is the only thing that could, and it is worth fighting for more than a flag, more than a belief.  It is truth to me, it is love.  It might be God.....to me and to some.

 

Either way, lets only end this in friendship and respect.  If anyone can it is a people with access to some herb!!!   

 

We are all related.  1Love.

 

 

 

  

 

 


hmmmmm.......

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imiubu
On 10/18/2018 at 12:50 PM, Limos said:

Damnit someone please tell me why what we have NOW is better than Prop 1. 

 

Why should we vote it down for something that hasn’t materialized yet...AKA hope

 

I wonder though... what compels us as a populace in MI to be in a hurry? 

Why, be in a hurry? In 2 years we can resolve this into cannabis being lawful not legal.

I really have to wonder why we think we need to vote for this NOW.

Media hype is why we feel rushed IMHO.

Today... I am looking at Canada for reference.

Also, it will take 2 more years to implement prop 1, js.

Again... what is the confounded RUSH to this???

Took the nation dam near 80 years to get this far, what is 2 more years to do it correctly?

Oh yeah, media hype being rammed at us continuously.

 

Hugs brah, it's not personal ya know    :smileys-passing-joint:


 

 

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imiubu

@GoodEnergyGrower beautifully stated.

 

I do hope that I am not coming across as argumentative as that is not my intended demeanor.  I do become passionate for sure yet,

I strive to remain respectful of all opinions, stick to the issue/s and nothing I present is a personal attack.  I think we need to openly

discuss the issues that affect/ effect each of us, as sharing ideas strengthens us as a whole, unites us further.  Seeing issues from

varying points of view assists in more informed choices.  We may not end up agreeing but we have widened our understanding of

each other and gained another point of view in the process.

 


 

 

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knucklehead bob

My problem with making cannabis "Legal" is that EVERYONE on this Forum knows that all Laws making cannabis Illegal which make us ALL criminals under Color of Law have no basis in fact ! NADA , ZERO , ZIP , ZILCH , the big GOOSE EGG . So instead of concentrating how we the people have been lied to , extorted our time , money , freedom & property by all the REEFER MADNESS LIES for 80 years , here are all these alleged activists begging the gubbermint for more "Legal" lies & regulatory capture ! Just don't make no sense to me to beg for Creator given rights . We will never expose the truth by covering it with more lies . A yes vote gives the Govt. your consent & agreement that cannabis needs to be legislated & regulated because of how dangerous it is and the voter isn't smart enough to know the difference . To believe cannabis arrests will decline is fools folly on top of wishful thinking .

 

Marijuana Arrests Are Increasing Despite Legalization, New FBI Data Shows

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2018/09/24/marijuana-arrests-are-increasing-despite-legalization-new-fbi-data-shows/#6ef2263b4c4b

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Limos

Who is gonna do it correctly? Constitutional amendments take bankrolls who funding? Does the language reach everyone in MI? 

 

Telling everyone one that’s been involved in the medical community to chill and wait makes sense but not to everyone else. Would you give up your card and wait 2 years for a hope of a constitutional amendment? 

 

I have ran into LEO 4 times cannibis related and 3 of the 4 were oh you got a card great see ya...the other was for me being over my amount and having weapons in the car unbeknownst to me. Without my card I would have been arrested 4/4 just like anyone not sporting a med card would because check it out...there is ZERO tolerance for non medical cannabis in the state of MI right now. 

 

I really see no reason to vote no. 

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shaggy

 

With Canada legalizing cannabis there is a lot to celebrate as it marks an end to Canada’s cannabis prohibition regime that began almost 100 years ago, but it’s not all fun and games- in many ways Oct. 17 marks the beginning of Prohibition 2.0.

There have been many, many fails during this whole legalization process, and CLN covered a few of those in an earlier article. It’s been a very long and bumpy road just getting to this point, and when you can still face up to 14 years in jail over cannabis, we’ve still got a long, long way to go.

Here are 3 more of Canada’s biggest legalization fails, so far.

 

Fail 1: No edibles

While smoking a joint is one of the most iconic and common methods of consuming cannabis, there are health concerns over the effects of inhaling cannabis smoke. Edibles offer a safer and healthier way to utilize the effects and benefits of cannabis because there is no smoking involved since you eat it, which makes it so much easier on your lungs. There are many people who would prefer edibles because of this.

As Dana Larsen, one of Canada’s most prominent cannabis activists, previously told CLN in an interview:

“Although [cannabis] buds have a lot of medicinal value, the real medicinal value of cannabis lies in extracts, capsules, edibles, suppositories, and those kinds of products.”

Too bad edibles and all those other products will still be illegal in Canada, even after Oct. 17 because only certain CBD products and smokeable flowers are being legalized, making this a huge fail for so-called legalization.


While the government has promised to start looking into legalizing edibles sometime in 2019, if you look at how long it took the severely out-of-touch government to legalize cannabis flower, it doesn’t inspire much hope at all. Who can forget Sen. Nicole Eaton, who infamously said that “5 grams is about 4 tokes” (which honestly could count as a separate fail unto itself)?

As much as the government says their approach to legalization is about public health, it has stalled on arguably the healthiest method of consuming 


Fail 2: 14 years in jail over a “legal” substance?!

This helpful chart below prepared by Trina Fraser, a partner at Brazeau Seller Law, was based on the first reading version of the Cannabis Act.

 

As you can see, in addition to fines that range anywhere from a few hundred dollars to thousands, you risk up to 14 years in jail for certain offences! Now is that really what you expected when Trudeau said he’d legalize cannabis in Canada?

Michael Bryant, a lawyer, former politician, and current executive director for the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, wrote an excellent article about how Bill C-45 essentially recriminalizes cannabis, where he calls out, among other things, Canada’s insanely harsh sentences, sa“There are new, more punitive and wholly disproportionate maximum sentences for running afoul of BillC45.  I know of no 14 year prison sentence arising from distribution of Smirnoff, let alone orchids.”

 

Fail 3: Canada’s licensed producer system
Many of these licensed producers are being run by former government insiders and cops who profited off of Prohibition and ruined countless lives in the process. Now that legalization is around the corner, they’re jumping into the cannabis industry and snatching up all those lucrative cannabis supply contracts (no doubt leveraging their cozy relationships with those in power) while doing everything they can to continue criminalizing the real growers and cannabis producers who have been doing this in Canada for decades.

You know, like the growers that put BC Bud on the map in the first place. But perhaps the LP’s are all rightfully worried about what this competition will do to their bottom lines as the OG growers actually know what they’re doing with skills built and passed down over generations.

LP’s haven’t been growing for very long at all and you can often tell from the irradiated, bunk weed they often produce. This is an example of crony capitalism in its purest form.

Crony capitalism: an economy in which businesses thrive not as a result of risk, but rather as a return on money amassed through a nexus between a business class and the political class.

Lawyer Michael Bryant, in his previously mentioned article, also called out the legal regime and the stinking hypocrisy of the cops and politicians who criminalized hundreds of thousands of Canadians for over a century who are now suddenly launching their own cannabis companies in the hopes of making a quick buck.


“Be that as it may, legalization has launched a beautiful friendship between cannabis capitalism, retired police captains, and government treasuries….

Ex-cons and addicts find no relief in this bill, which rewards heretofore opponents of legalization with riches piled upon their taxpayer pensions, but nothing, nothing, nothing by way of new legal or economic opportunities for those punished by cannabis prohibition to date.”

And as much as these Prohibitionists may claim they’ve had a change of heart because they’ve seen the medical benefits of cannabis first-hand, how many of them do you think are calling for cannabis amnesty for those whose lives they ruined?


 

bill-c45-offences.jpg

 

So it would seem the same people that sent you to prison are now the same folks selling you cannabis.

Something about buying pot from a former cop just makes me sick to my stomach.

 


Methods of inducing SAR Local Acquired Resistance and Induced Systemic Resistance                                   I.P.M. INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT

                Do plants need silicon?                   ODA finds bottled microbes with little live organisms                          Welcome to Z-Library!

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shaggy

Former DEA agents now selling legal pot, there is something really wrong here WTF!

Former DEA Agent Patrick Moen — whose career with the Drug Enforcement Administration went up in smoke when he joined the lucrative legal marijuana industry.
Moen is the second DEA agent with Oregon ties to make the once-unthinkable jump to the marijuana industry. Paul Schmidt, who once served as the highest-ranking DEA agent in Oregon, then after working as a state inspector of medical pot dispensaries in Colorado is now working as a medical marijuana business consultant.

Schmidt, who testified as a federal drug agent in marijuana cases throughout the region, including Washington, Colorado and Wyoming, said he saw marijuana as the “least of the evils” 
Really he saw $$$$$$$$$ signs in his head!
Next month Schmidt will hold a series of seminars around the state advising prospective medical marijuana retailers about Oregon's new dispensary law. The $95 per-person seminars will include "fresh perspectives on the developing cannabis market," according to the flier.

Moen, for his part, told The Seattle Times he has not used marijuana in the last 20 years.
Is he saying more than 20 yrs ago he used cannabis?
Sounds to me like he was a pot smoker turned DEA...WTF!
Now after putting people in jail for pot for many years he is now in the Cannabiz.


"It's extremely ironic," said Hilary Bricken, a Seattle-based marijuana business lawyer. "You go from cracking skulls to supporting the very effort that you once vowed to entirely destroy.

“It is disappointing when law enforcement officers, sworn to uphold the laws of the United States with honor, courage and integrity, abandon their commitment to work in an industry involved in trafficking marijuana,” Seattle-based DEA Special Agent-in-Charge Matthew Barnes told Reuters.
source
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-us...A0J0PM20140120

Do you think this will help protect them for legal troubles?
Do you think he still talks to the other members of the DEA?
Talk about having the DEA on your payroll..LOL

Having the DEA as your enforcer, it would be easy as pie to eliminate your competition.
In the old days we would refer to this as paying off the cops.
In this case no bribe is needed, just put them on the payroll easy-peasy.


Methods of inducing SAR Local Acquired Resistance and Induced Systemic Resistance                                   I.P.M. INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT

                Do plants need silicon?                   ODA finds bottled microbes with little live organisms                          Welcome to Z-Library!

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shaggy

The same people that sent you to prison for pot, will now sell pot to you!

DPDsplash.jpg

 

What??
Delaware - Ex-Trooper To Run First Marijuana Dispensary.
And HE Possibly gained his license illegally!

You don't think the cannabis laws are screwed up?

The same guy's that sent you to prison will now sell the pot to you!

This is not a one time deal either.

Delaware has signed a two-year contract with a company led by a lobbyist and former aide to U.S. Sen. Tom Carper to operate the state's first medical marijuana dispensary, which should begin serving patients early next year. Mark Lally, president of First State Compassion Center, which won the Department of Health and Social Services contract, also is a former state trooper. "First State is committed to creating a facility that provides safe access to high quality, affordable medicine to licensed patients in Delaware," the company said in a written statement.

The dispensary will be located at 37 Germay Drive inside an industrial park just west of Wilmington. Marijuana growing operations are set to begin this fall, the director of Delaware's Division of Public Health told lawmakers in letters this week. Lawmakers passed legislation in 2011 to legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The law, signed by Gov. Jack Markell, called for three medical marijuana dispensaries – one in each county. The center near Wilmington is opening as a pilot facility.

"The Division of Public Health and the Office of Medical Marijuana are committed to providing oversight and support to help First State Compassion Center provide patients with a safe place to acquire the medication they need to attain an improved quality of life," Dr. Karyl Rattay, director of the Division of Public Health, told Sen. Margaret Rose Henry, D-Wilmington, in one of the letters.

Rattay said First State Compassion Center "has assembled an experienced team with a high level of competency in the field of medical marijuana." One of the firm's principals, she said, was "deeply involved" with operating a medical marijuana dispensary in Rhode Island. She said the facility will be within driving distance of a large percentage of Delaware's population and is near two bus stops.

The signing of the contract comes despite a lawsuit filed against Lally in Delaware Chancery Court by former Lewes City Councilman Jud Bennett. He claims Lally breached a contract to help him win the contract to operate Delaware's dispensary. A judge is still weighing Lally's motion to dismiss. "They have won the battle, but not the war," Bennett said by email. Jill Fredel, a spokeswoman for the state Health Department, said the department was not concerned the lawsuit would affect operation of the dispensary.

"Our first concern is for the patients who will be served, and we did consider the potential effect of the lawsuit on First State Compassion Center's operations," Fredel said. "While we can't predict the outcome of litigation, we are satisfied that First State can continue to serve patients even if there is an adverse result in the case." Delaware's law allows dispensaries to cultivate no more than 150 plants and keep no more than 1,500 ounces of medical marijuana on site at any time. Access to the marijuana is limited to qualified patients and registered caregivers.

Just take a look who is getting these licenses?????

Politicians that voted repeatedly to trash cannabis are now the same people selling cannabis to you.biggrin.gif

Something very strange is going on here.
check into it.....it may surprise you who the people running the cannabis industry are.

From Judges to casino owners.....mostly people who were against cannabis before they saw $$$$$$$.

 

Edited by shaggyballs

Methods of inducing SAR Local Acquired Resistance and Induced Systemic Resistance                                   I.P.M. INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT

                Do plants need silicon?                   ODA finds bottled microbes with little live organisms                          Welcome to Z-Library!

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shaggy

Lets make a list of all the ex-cops, judges and such making money from Cannabis.

 

If all these folks had spoke up when they were jailing people for cannabis the world would be a different place.
The intentions of this thread are not to call people out or to be any type of accusation or hurtful to anyone in any way.
I would just like to know what these folks are thinking and why?

Anyway:
Here is what I found so far.
Thank you to TheBlackman for the Canadian list.

Canada
-Chuck Rifici, was the CFO of the Liberal Party of Canada.
* founder and former CEO of Tweed
(now partnered with Toyko Smoke to form Nesta.co)

-Mark Zekulin, CEO of Tweed
•former senior adviser to former Ontario finance minister Dwight Duncan

-Norman Inkster, Independent Director at Mettrum
•former head of the RCMP

-Dr. Joshua Tepper, Independent Director at Mettrum
•formerly Assistant Deputy Minister at the Ministry of Health , Senior Medical Officer for Health Canada,

-Tom Shipley, Director of Quality Assurance, Tweed
•formerly worked on toxicology research, while at Health Canada,

-Mike Harcourt, Chairman of True Leaf Medicine Inc
•former B.C. Premier

-Kash Heed, strategic consultant with National Green BioMed
•Former B.C. Solicitor General and former West Vancouver police chief

-Herb Dhaliwal, Chairman, National Green BioMed
•former Vancouver MP and federal cabinet minister.

-John Turner, medicinal marijuana applicant in Ontario (With Kash Heed)
•Former Prime Minister of Canada

-Mr. Belot, Board of Directors for Aurora
•was a public servant in several ministries within the Ontario government

-Brian Wagner, Company founder and CEO NHP Consulting (consults for prospective LP's)
•Brian was invited to play a strong role in Health Canada’s Program Advisory Committee

-Tim Humberstone, ABcann Director / Senior Person in Charge
•former twenty year member of the RCMP included roles in Municipal/Federal Drug Enforcement and with the Joint Forces Organized Crime Agency. Tim has also received extensive training by the RCMP in providing expert court opinion in the fields of cannabis trafficking and production techniques.

-Ivan Vrana, founder of Aslan Ross Consulting / speaker mmpr summit
•Previously Mr. Vrána worked for the Federal Government for over 15 years. He worked at the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, Finance Canada and in various senior policy positions at Health Canada. At Health Canada he was in charge of the team that developed the policy rationale which led to the implementation of the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations.Mr. Vrána is also a regular Lecturer at both Carleton and Concordia universities and teaches a course that examines the internal communication tools governments use to development and implement public policy.

-Sandy Pratt, Chief Financial Officer, Emerald Health
•Worked at Deloitte ( auditing firm involved in the senate scandal), Vice President of Business Development and Executive Financial Officer of the Royal British Columbia Museum, a Crown corporation.

-Shane Morris, VP, Scientific Affairs and Stakeholder Relations Hydropothecary CEO (now Canadian Cannabis Corp.)
•Since 2000, Shane has been in a range of leadership roles within the Federal Government, from Treasury Board of Canada’s senior advisor (Cabinet Operations) on regulatory affairs to director of policy leadership and Reporting for Resources Canada’s major projects management office.

-George Smitherman, THC BioMed
former Ontario Liberal deputy premier
•more than 30 years to public policy fields at the Municipal, Provincial and Federal Level, where roles as Senior Advisor, Minister of Energy and Infrastructure and Ontario’s Minister of Health were held.

-Jake Ryan, Director of Security: Tilray
* former RCMP Intelligence Officer and federal criminal investigator overseeing all aspects of Tilray's security protocols and operations.

-Ernie Eves, Chairman, Timeless Herbal Care — a Jamaican medical marijuana company.
•former Progressive Conservative premier of Ontario

-Kim Derry, a promoter of marijuana facility THC Meds Ontario Inc.
•deputy chief of the Toronto Police Service under Mr. Blair,

-John Reynolds, advisor to Vodis Innovative Pharmaceuticals Inc
•former MP with the Progressive Conservative, Reform and Canadian Alliance parties.

-Senator Larry Campbell, advisor to Vodis Innovative Pharmaceuticals Inc.
•former Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer and Vancouver mayor. And sitting Senator...

-Barry Daniel, Wildflower’s head of security
•Former Abbotsford police chief.

-Cam Battley, Aurora Senior Vice President, Communications and Medical Affairs
•Former Legislative Assistant to the Canadian Minister of Consumer and Corporate Affairs, where he was responsible for developing legislation and steering it through the House of Commons, as well as negotiating with Opposition parties and stakeholder groups.

USA

Former DEA Agent Patrick Moen joined the lucrative legal marijuana industry.
Another OR. DEA agent has made the switch also, Paul Schmidt, who once served as the highest-ranking DEA agent in Oregon, then after working as a state inspector of medical pot dispensaries in Colorado is now working as a medical marijuana business consultant.


Below is the list of the 30 law enforcement officials who support legal cannabis.
Norm Stamper—retired Seattle Police Chief
Don Clark— retired Multnomah County Sheriff
Stephen Downing— retired Los Angeles Police Department Deputy Chief
Kris Olson— retired US Attorney for the District of Oregon
Bill Riggs— retired Oregon Supreme Court Justice, Circuit Court Trial Judge and Court of Appeals Judge
Inge Fryklund— retired Assistant State’s Attorney
Paul Stiegleder— retired Lieutenant Sheriff
Darian Stanford— former Drug Unit Prosecutor
Pete Tutmark— former County Deputy Sheriff
Jay Fished—Prosecutor
Tony Ryan—retired Denver Police Department Lieutenant
Finn Selander—retired Special Agent
Jason Thomas—former Detention Officer and Sheriff’s Deputy
John Baker—retired Sergeant
Jay Fleming—former Undercover Narcotics Officer
Le Roy Washington—retired Federal Probation Officer
Nicholas Dial—former Deputy Sheriff
Arnold Byron—retired US Customs Inspector
Matt McCally—former Corrections Officer
MacKenzie Allen—retired Deputy Sherif
Leonard Frieling—former Judge
Jim Doherty—former Prosecutor and Corrections Officer
Shelley Fox-Loken—retired Parole and Probation Officer
James Peet—former Police Officer
David A Nichols—retired Superior Court Judge
David Doddridge—retired Narcotics Officer and Military Police Officer
Diane Goldstein—retired Lieutenant Commander
Kyle Kazan—former Police Officer
Nate Bradley—former Deputy Sheriff
Leo Laurence—former Deputy Sheriff

Source
https://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/12/28...-industry.html


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shaggy

Ask yourself when these people put other folks in prison did they care or even think about what they were doing.

Now they are doing just what they sent folks to prison for and making serious cash doing it.

Do these people even have a concience?

Should they not be saying that what we did was wrong and stop the future prosecutions of anyone else.

At least do that before they start cashing in on the same crop that sent folks to prison.

My 2 cents anyhow.

:smoking-banana-smiley-emoticon: Shag


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Limos

https://www.wikileaf.com/thestash/michigan-law-prop-1/

 

Law enforcement in Michigan doesn’t want its citizens to have legal access to cannabis. Despite the fact enforcing laws against weed drains significant resources from the taxpayer budget, the Michigan cops and prosecutors have thrown their voices out against a ballot proposal to legalize recreational marijuana that will be put to the voters during next month’s election.

Michigan Police Are Speaking Up Against Cannabis

Last month, Michigan police departments, along with county prosecutor offices, came out publicly against a ballot Proposal 18-1 that would make it legal for individuals 21 and older to purchase, possess and use marijuana and marijuana-infused edibles, grow up to 12 marijuana plants for personal consumption, and permit retail sales of marijuana and edibles contingent upon a 10% tax.

Michigan’s Ingham County Sheriff Scott Wriggelsworth a dismissed the state revenue arguments for legalizing cannabis a press conference, instead arguing that the ballot initiative is “about people wanting to get high, whenever they want to, however they want to.”

iStock / polybutmono

“This isn’t about freeing up cops, this is not about freeing up bed space, it’s not about tax revenue to the state so we can fix our roads,” Wriggelsworth said. “For us as a state to do that makes literally no sense to me whatsoever.”

The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, or CRMLA, is leading the campaign in support of Proposal 1. The political action committee spokesperson John Truscott said in a statement to the press that the law enforcement officials were using “troubling scare tactics in an attempt to mislead voters.”

“We encourage an open and honest debate on this important issue,” CRMLA said. “Unfortunately, that’s now what we can see from who have chosen to confuse the public with dubious or contested statistics rather than discuss facts.”

Truscott pointed to studies that show opioid deaths have dropped by 25 percent since states, such as Colorado and Washington, implemented legal marijuana sales for adult use. Contrary to statistics that the police organization was using, Truscott said that there is no reliable data to show a significant increase in cannabis use among young adults following legalization efforts.

The People Fight Back

According to Ballotpedia, CRMLA has raised $1.74 million to help with the legalization campaign. In addition, the Marijuana Policy Project has donated more than $633,013 to the CRMLA.

There are several other organizations that have signaled their support for Prop 1, including MI Legalize, Michigan Cannabis Coalition, Michigan NORML, the National Patients Rights Association, the ACLU, and the Marijuana Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan.

iStock / smontgom65

In 2015, federal data demonstrated that somewhere close to 15% of Michigan residents used marijuana; an estimated 10% of those living there used the drug at least once a month.

Michigan has a robust medical marijuana industry that’s been operating since voters approved an initiative in 2008 . Recreational marijuana possession, use, and sale remains illegal, although the possession and use charges have been decriminalized in multiple localities including Detroit, Flint, and Grand Rapids. 

In 2015, marijuana arrests in the midwestern state were more common than shoplifting arrests. Police made 23,893 arrests that involved marijuana that year, accounting for 9% of all arrests, according to Michigan State Police data. About 64% of the marijuana arrests were for possession or use. 

Michigan NORML Board Member Brad Forrester tried to explain in a blog post the reason that he thought the law enforcement agents were coming out against recreational cannabis legalization. Forrester thought that the police and prosecutors wouldn’t likely welcome the loss of workloads without marijuana arrests and convictions.

“[Law enforcements] inability to arrest people with cannabis will have a huge impact on the policies of every department across the state because in 2016, marijuana arrests accounted for 9% of ALL arrests that year!” said Forrester. 

“Readjusting to a new paradigm where it’s legal for people to grow and possess cannabis, a paradigm where 9% of your workload vanishes overnight, that will take time for members of law enforcement to accept, but eventually they will.”

Forrester said that the opponents were pointing to an unreliable report from a federally funded task force known as the Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area that fuels “modern mythology” about the impact of cannabis legalization in Colorado.

The War on People of Color

The negative effects of cannabis prohibition enforcement land disproportionately on black people, who use marijuana at the same rates as whites but are around four times more likely to be arrested their marijuana use or possession. This points to bias within the criminal justice system that means black people are vastly most likely to go to jail for this non-violent crime than white people.

While states that have passed laws to permit the sale of recreational cannabis have seen arrest rates fall for marijuana-related offenses, keeping fewer people in the prison system, there is a racial disparity in arrest rates for states that have legalized recreational marijuana.

If Prop 1 is passed, recreational marijuana will be subject to the state’s 6% sales tax and a 10% excise tax. That is lower than other states such as Washington where the excise tax is at 37%. The stated reason for the lower tax rate is to draw prices lower than the black market by making sure legal weed is cheaper than the alternatives.

The revenues generated from the excise tax will be dedicated to costs associated with implementing the legislation, as well as schools, roads, clinical mental health trials, and municipalities where marijuana businesses are located.

 There are 30 states across the United States —  as well as Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia — that have given the thumbs up to the legalization of medicinal or recreational marijuana. In addition to Michigan, voters in North Dakota will decide whether to legalize recreational sales while voters in Missouri and Utah will decide on medical marijuana on ballot votes this upcoming November. 

Experts estimate Michigan could make $100 million to $200 million dollars per year from revenue generated by the marijuana sales excise tax.

was last modified: October 11th, 2018 by Taran Volckhausen
 

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shaggy

@Limos

Nice post⏫

 

The right thing for the government to do would be to admit the reasons that weed was made illegal was not totally honest and that it should never been a controlled substance in the first place.

Then the powers that be should let anyone that was placed in prison unjustly out with expongement rights.

After explaining how they lied and manipulated the public mindset about cannabis and then they should come out and tell the truth about its benefits stating this substance really had/has no reason to be controlled.

 

One reason from the above post, as to why not completely remove it from the controlled substance act is it will put too many cops and judges and the like out of work....What a crock!

Them fuckers will just start selling weed when the dust settles, they are connected from the inside.

See my many posts above on this subject!

 

So America I say we just remove cannabis from the controlled substances act and be done with it.

Why do they still say it is a dangerous substance that needs to be kept out of the hands of the public?

The burden of proof is on them.

 

Peace

shag

Edited by shaggyballs

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imiubu

From that article, it looks like the NO votes are climbing.

57% is a good hedge but it's still only a poll. 

Maybe due to the rise of the No folks is why the guys I spoke with last night were trying so hard to convince me to vote yes...

they are perhaps worried the ppl of MI are waking up and will turn this down?

 

I ran into the three musketeers (Rick< Jaime, Eric) of mi legal lies at dab o ween last night.  I get the creeps around those guys

but decided to bend Eric's ear a bit on the fine points of Prop 1.  We discussed our differing opinions and neither of us were able

to convince the other to change our vote.  The only point he made, and that has also been pointed out in this thread is:

If Prop one goes down, what will our legislators write up for us?  It sure won't be for we the people.  It will cater to their corp

buddies.  And, I agreed to that being a real threat.  There are too many rich cats in the state already spending fat cash on these

warehouse grows.

Eric agreed that this still is a pos piece of language and all my points to vote no are valid also. 

He say's "let's do this, then we'll do abrogate".  Oh boy, I did laugh out loud.  Cheeky sob lol.  So, I said "if prop 1 goes through, then

all you guys are going to come over to push End Prohibition Michigan?".  He replied "yes, of course!".  How do you know a politician

is lying?  His mouth is open. 

 


 

 

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Limos

Waking up? What are they waking up too? Keep the current draconian laws as is? Guess I’ll stay sleeping 😴 😉

 

At least you got to bend their ear. 

 

Most have made up their mind...the rest will fall subject to the advertising budget. 

 

It is strange that you guys are in the majority of LEOs camp to keep the status quo. I know you’re working with a new initiative but I believe you guys are looking at the wrong. It’ll be a series of small battles not one big war or initiative that will get to tomato. 

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shaggy

I don't see why this is not doable?

If it was all lies, then come clean, real simple in my book.

On 10/26/2018 at 10:16 PM, shaggyballs said:

The right thing for the government to do would be to admit the reasons that weed was made illegal was not totally honest and that it should never been a controlled substance in the first place.

Then the powers that be should let anyone that was placed in prison unjustly out with expongement rights.

After explaining how they lied and manipulated the public mindset about cannabis and then they should come out and tell the truth about its benefits stating this substance really had/has no reason to be controlled.

 

One reason from the above post, as to why not completely remove it from the controlled substance act is it will put too many cops and judges and the like out of work....What a crock!

Them fuckers will just start selling weed when the dust settles, they are connected from the inside.

See my many posts above on this subject!

 

So America I say we just remove cannabis from the controlled substances act and be done with it.

Why do they still say it is a dangerous substance that needs to be kept out of the hands of the public?

The burden of proof is on them.

 

Peace

shag

 

The Govt. would say:

Oh, we would do that but, have you seen the money at stake???

That would be a crime not to cash in on that.

 

If you accept what they are currently offering you will never get any more.

For example if no personal gowing was part of prop 1 and you wanted to vote yes, in hopes of making home growing part of legalization.

That would not be the best plan.

 

And you bet your ass Corp. Cannabis is just waiting to push all the little grows out.

Tomatoes is out, I agree but we should think before we the culture, (that has push back against the machine, despite being threatend will prison) give it all away to corp. Cannabis.

I really think we can do better than prop 1, but we will never know if we take the first deal that sounds ok.

 

I think the will of the people should be done at any cost, America is supposed to work like that, if it is not working to do the will of the people it it then considered broken.

If that is the case and the will of the people will not be recognized, we the people should demand it be fixed and not take no for an answer.

If our demands are not being met, it is then out duty to clean the corruption out of lansing and fix things to ensure the will of the people is being honored properly.

I myself think the will of the people is not being honored today.

So some fixin' is in order, I think most would agree we have coruption in lansing that is not helping things.

 

Don't forget without an amendment (as hard as it may be to get) to the state constitution your home growing rights can and probably will be stripped from the law.

Corp. Cannabis will not want the competition and the State will want all the tax money they can get their greedy hands on.

 

What are the thoughts of legalization that does not allow home grows?

Would you vote yes on current legalization if you heard from behind closed doors that there was plans to strip home growing or lower plant counts to 2 in flower?

It is cool to be able to talk about this without being personally attacked, so thanks to all here!:smoking-a-joint-smiley-emoticon:


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xxPeacePipexx

I feel like this will be a close vote, one that's yet able to be swayed either way. It's like choosing the lesser of evils though in a sense for many, and naturally the opposition like Leo is in full force trying to persuade us all how evil and horrific this will be for the state....

 

Either way, were getting fucked yet again, but for the majority (non carded) this is a big change for the wrong even though it feels right and is lubed.

 

Decriminalize many want, and some have with exceptions now in Michigan, but naturally everyone can be divided. This were seeing now and this will only get worse off until November 6th. Talk about November coming Fire...

 

I have to admit this- I'm not voting regardless. That's like giving my consent to be governed. No thanks and for the record, I feel the same about the tribal governments. Sovereign people should never be dictated by their own. 

 

With the recent changes in Canada as well as the big American gov't giving Indian nations the legal rights is just insulting, nothing new and this too is affecting many native reservations\reserves all while creating even more division among the communities... 

 

I just want this drug war to be over with,  and for those in need of help to find it without fear of prosecution. I just don't understand criminalizing sick people in need of help...


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imiubu
6 hours ago, Limos said:

 

 

At least you got to bend their ear. 

 

Most have made up their mind...the rest will fall subject to the advertising budget. 

 

When a couple of the same folks that pushed this,  the same milegalize cats... admit this is a pos legislation, what more do I need say?

 

 

 

I have out spoken against this initiative since it was first published in what... Jan 2017? 

I only recently began 'officially' working with End Prohibition Michigan. 

 

I am wondering which is more utopian thinking;

believing our gov't will actually honor a peoples law andthat LEO will actually uphold said law.

OR

Believing we the people can join together to bring cannabis to its rightful place and under rule of law as any other

herb with medicinal properties? 

Why should we be paying sin taxes on what is food and medicine?

 

In the end it isn't going to matter much to most of us who have been in this for most our lives. 

We won't be doing anything much different that we have in the past.

The underground will thrive as it always has.


 

 

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Limos

You know when the MMMA was first proposed  did or would you all have the same opinion? Did you vote against it? 🤔 

 

I mean they charge for the application & card to enact regulations & what theman phrases as regulatory capture. I hope you all took a stand against that POS proposition.

 

Or were you like this is the first step in breaking the stigma? 

 

I shouldnt  have to feel like Morpheus from the matrix...you guys can see why this prop (while might be a POS) is the right move toward better laws. 

 

You think that’s air you’re breathing? Hmm

 

I’m with you guys really I am but I’m trying to be pragmatic...the general population is not ready for abrogate. IDK if you’ve guys talked with some of these ass backwards prohibitionist or you’re living in that medical bubble but these people will not vote to give us freedom...maybe they will if there’s a tax incentive...it’s a hard pill to swallow.  This is a step to stop some BS...yes there’s other BS attached to it...yes people with $ are gonna make more $ but damn stop locking people up for simple possession seems like a no brainer to me. 

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